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Troubleshooting Automotive Paint Job Problems – Creating the Best Finish

Posted by hotcrowd on August 29, 2010

www.streetrodderweb.com Help with Troubleshooting Paint Job Problems

Help With Troubleshooting Paint Problems
Learn The Causes And Cures
From the January, 2009 issue of Street Rodder
By Jim Rizzo
Photography by PPG
It’s pretty exciting to see do-it-yourselfers attempting some of the more difficult aspects of street rod building on their own these days, and bodywork and painting are prime examples. These tasks, which in the past have more often than not been relegated to experts, are ones more and more are tackling with surprisingly good results. But as with any craft, painting is an art that’s perfected by practice-kind of tough when as a hobbyist you paint maybe one vehicle a year. So it’s with this in mind that we decided to try and put together a bit of a primer (no pun intended) referencing some of the most common paint problems many of us have or will encounter during the course of any paint job or jobs we’ve done or will possibly do. Hopefully the following information will help us novice painters identify-and with any luck rectify-some situations that’d otherwise have us tearing our hair out or tossing our spray guns in the trash bin.
Prepping For Paint
In a future issue we’ll revisit body work and paint prep in a much more in-depth manner, but let’s touch base on the obvious for the time being. As is the case with many aspects of hot rod building, proper preparation is key, and plays an important part in causing or preventing many of the following examples. In a nutshell, any surface to be finished should be well-cleaned before painting. If the surface is bare metal and the paint manufacturer’s instructions call for it, the surface should be chemically treated, as well. Use compressed air and tack rag to remove all dust and dirt-remember, no amount of primer or paint will cover up a badly prepared surface.
Today’s finishes are extremely complex and include both solvent-based and waterborne types, and most require the addition of solvents (thinners or reducers) to form the proper spraying viscosity. Others may simply require the addition of a second component at a prescribed ratio to obtain a sprayable consistency. The majority also have hardeners or other catalysts, which must be added to ensure correct color match, gloss, hardness, drying time, or other characteristics necessary to produce a nice, successful finish. And please, always make sure you take the time to read the instructions and/or any specific finish material data sheets accompanying whatever paint and material you choose to use! And again remember that it’s never a good idea to mix materials from various manufacturers.
Once you’ve got your surface prepped and ready to be sprayed, the next step would be to know the type and color of paint your project requires-with this determined, follow the manufacturer’s instruction for preparing it exactly. If you have any doubts about how to proceed, don’t guess! Contact your paint supplier for help, because improperly prepared primers, sealers, or paints will rarely produce a good finish and often cause huge amounts of heartache-believe me, I know from firsthand experience!
A major attribute which determines the sprayablility of paint and how much film may be applied is its viscosity, or consistency. Following the instructions on the cans will get you close, but for professional results you gotta use a viscosity cup. Unlike the old days, when I used to just watch how the paint ran off my paint paddle, the advanced finishes of today need to be handled much more professionally. It only takes a minute, and checking paint’s viscosity is a simple but very accurate way to measure its thickness. Viscosity cups are available anywhere automotive paint is sold, and they’re easy to use, too.
Always mix your paint in a clean, dust-free environment. Paint’s got a remarkable ability to attract dirt, and dirty paint will not only possibly muck up your spray gun, but it will also ruin an otherwise good paint job. That said, make it a habit of always pouring paint into the cup or tank (if you’re using a pressure pot) through a paint strainer.
Okay, now that we’ve touched on the common sense basics, let’s move on to our primary focus-recognizing and addressing the causes of the most common of paint problems. Just keep mind that I’m just a hobbyist, not a trained paint pro, and this is just info gleaned from asking questions and personal experiences-meaning if you read this and then have a problem of your own, I won’t be coming over to fix it for ya.

Fisheyes
Fisheyes are small, circular, crater-like openings that appear either during or shortly after you lay down a coat of paint or primer (though primer is often much more forgiving). They’re caused primarily by spraying over a surface that’s contaminated with oil, grease, silicone, or wax (Note: the mold-release agent on a new fiberglass body is a really common culprit), but can also be caused by using thinner or reducer in place of a wax and grease remover during your pre-paint preparation. Though not as common, an occasional cause may also be painting over an existing finish where an additive like Smoothie (a fisheye preventer) had been used.

Wrinkling
Wrinkling, often called lifting, is when an existing paint layer shrivels during the application of a new finish or as the new finish dries. This is caused by the solvents in the new finish attacking the old finish. You’ll most likely see this malady when recoating enamels or urethanes that are not fully cured, or if and when you exceed the maximum flash (dry) or recoat time during application. It’ll also sometimes happen when you recoat a basecoat/clearcoat finish where the old clearcoat had an insufficient film build. In this situation, you’ll have to strip and refinish. This circumstance can be prevented by not exceeding a product’s maximum recoat time during or after application, by not shooting lacquer over enamel or urethane, or avoiding spraying under or top coats excessively wet.

Bleeding
In this particular case, bleeding isn’t something you’d grab a bandage for-bleeding in this situation is when you end up with a discoloration in your topcoat color (most commonly a red or yellow stain) when painting over an existing finish. This is because the solvent in the fresh topcoat sometimes dissolves soluble pigments in the old finish, allowing them to seep upward into the fresh paint, thus discoloring it. You’ll also sometimes see this when red crme hardener used in body filler bleeds up through a light color. You can sometimes repair a situation like this by letting the stained topcoat fully cure and then spraying a two-component sealer over it followed by a fresh coat of color. If you think you may encounter a possible bleeding situation, your best bet would be to use a good sealer before topcoat, or in the case of body filler under a light topcoat using white crme hardener instead of red or blue.

Die Back
Die back, also known as dulling or hazing, is the dulling of a finish’s gloss or shine as it dries or ages. This one is pretty common and has quite a few different causes. I’ve found that you’ll be more susceptible to die back if you don’t allow adequate drying or curing time of your undercoat, or if you close up a freshly painted vehicle in a booth or garage with no air circulation. The latter cause happens because in a sealed environment the evaporating solvents from the new finish hang around in the air and react with the still-drying paint surface, causing it to dull out. Other possible causes are too short a flash time between coats, using cheap off-brand thinners or reducers, and sometimes an excessively heavy and wet final coat. You can repair die back by letting the finish dry thoroughly and then cutting and buffing it or you can sand and refinish. You can also help to avoid the problem in the first place by applying your topcoats according to the product’s directions, allowing sufficient flash times between coats, using the correct and/or recommended thinners or reducers, and making sure you’ve got good air flow around the vehicle as soon as it’s tack-free.

Checking
Checking, sometimes referred to as crow’s feet, are cracks of various lengths and widths that show up in a topcoat (if you’ve ever been to El Mirage or any other dry lakebed, you’ll recognize checking right off the bat). This is one problem that has a number of possible causes. The most common causes are excessive film thickness, too short of a flash time between coats, force-drying your undercoat (like using the blowgun to dry primer), and sometimes by using too much hardener or catalyst in the primer or paint. The only way to fix checking is to strip all crazed and cracked paint film and do the whole job over. You can usually save yourself a whole lotta work by preventing the problem by actually reading and following all label instructions, by removing checked surfaces completely before you spray over ‘em in the first place, and by making sure your material, both undercoats and topcoats, are thoroughly mixed before spraying.

Sags
Also sometimes known as runs, hangers, or curtains. Sags are, along with dust, one of the most prolific paint problems for the hobbyist or occasional painter. I have to admit, in my many quests for slick finishes I’ve created way more than my share of curtains in my day. The most common causes are holding the gun too close to the surface, moving too slowly across a panel, and double coating an area. Over-thinning/reducing is also a possible cause, along with trying to paint in an environment that is too cold (I’ve done that one too). To fight runs and sags, you’ve gotta hold your gun perpendicular to the surface and keep it a steady and correct distance from the panel, all the while moving it fast enough that you don’t pile the paint on, yet slow enough to get good coverage and flow-a process that comes with practice and experience.
If you do “sew some curtains,” in some cases you can wipe the area with a solvent-wetted rag and then clean and re-spray the area (seldom a first choice), or you can keep on going and wait till the paint fully cures and then sand and buff or sand and re-spray.

Orange Peel
Orange peel is another of the more common paint problems we run into, and its name is pretty self-explanatory. It’s an uneven paint film that has a texture that, well, looks like an orange peel. This predicament is more often than not caused by under-thinning/reducing the paint, spraying at too low a pressure, or a combination of both. Other causes may well be too fast a thinner or reducer, piling on too many or too heavy coats, or improper spray gun adjustment. Depending on severity orange peel can be repaired by compounding and polishing, or wet sanding with 1200-grit or finer paper and then buffing, or sanding and re-spraying the surface.
You can usually prevent orange peel by thinning/reducing your paint according to label instructions (are we beginning to see a pattern here, folks?), using the correct speed of thinner/reducer for the ambient temperature, using the correct air pressure, and avoiding really heavy coats.

Edge Mapping
Edge mapping, also known as feather edge lifting or edge ringing, is caused by the solvent from a fresh topcoat penetrating a sensitive area of an undercoat (most commonly the featheredges of a repaired area). You’ll recognize it as a wrinkled area outlining a repaired area. When painting a vehicle with repair areas (meaning almost everything those of us who can’t afford a new steel aftermarket body will end up painting), it’s always a good idea to use a two-component primer surfacer, water-base primer surfacer, or an appropriate sealer that’ll create a barrier between the repair and the fresh topcoat.
If you do encounter edge mapping, you’ll have to sand, smooth, or remove the affected area and seal it with a good barrier coat of some kind (your paint supplier will be able to recommend one for ya). Another thing that helps to prevent featheredge lifting is to always final sand a repair area with 400-grit or finer paper-the finer the final sanding, the shallower the sand scratches will be, and there’ll be less area for the solvent to attack.

Air Trapping
Air trapping causes small craters that are similar in appearance to fisheyes. These are caused by tiny air bubbles trapped in the fresh paint film that rise to the surface and “pop,” causing small, crater-like depressions. These “craters” are usually caused by under atomization of the paint due to either too low of an air pressure setting, improper spray gun adjustment, spraying with your gun too close to the surface, or moving your gun too slowly across a panel. Depending on its severity, cratering can be repaired by either sanding with 1200-grit or finer paper and then polishing to restore gloss, or by sanding and re-spraying the area. You can avoid this problem by maintaining correct spray gun speed and distance, making sure you’ve got the right cap/nozzle/needle setup for the type of product you’re spraying, and making sure you’re using the correct recommended air pressure.

Sand Scratches
Sand scratches show up as lines or marks in the paint film that mirror the marks in the surface being painted. They may also show up as streaks in the topcoat that magnify marks in the undercoat or substrate layer. These are caused by improper or incomplete final sanding of bodywork or primer coats (using too coarse of a paper), trying to cover scratches by filling ‘em with primer, or in some cases by sanding single stage or basecoat finishes before clearing them. You can fix ‘em by letting the finish cure and then carefully re-sanding the area with an ultra-fine paper and then refinishing it.
You can avoid sand scratches by graduating your sanding from coarse to fine papers, and not sanding basecoat colors before clearcoat (though if you do have to sand the basecoat for some reason make sure you apply additional basecoat color before clearing). Use 1200-grit or finer paper for color sanding.

Crazing
Crazing and cracking is a condition in which cracks (or lines) of different lengths and direction form in the finish. This is caused by excessive film thickness of either the topcoat or undercoat. It can also be caused by shooting over a previously crazed surface, using too much hardener in either your primer or paint, not thoroughly mixing your spray materials, or using off-brand or another brand of reducer or hardener in your mixture. The only way to correctly fix this paint problem is to strip the area and refinish it. You can usually prevent crazing by always following the material manufacturer’s label instructions, by always using a manufacturer’s complete line of products (no intermixing of different brands), and making sure you mix your coatings completely before spraying.

Peeling
Peeling or delamination is a loss of adhesion between a paint film and the substrate (the material being painted), causing sections of paint to separate from the surface. Though all paint problems are aggravating, there’s nothing worse than leaving the driveway with a shiny new paint job and arriving at the donut shop in a bare metal car. Peeling is most commonly caused by poor surface preparation, usually insufficient sanding or cleaning. But there are other causes, too, like omitting or using the wrong primer for your substrate (the surface being painted), exceeding the paint product’s recommended recoat time, or in the case of clearcoat colors spraying the colorcoat too dry, using an incompatible clearcoat, or incorrect colorcoat reduction.
You can prevent peeling by, again, reading the damn instructions for the products you’re using, properly cleaning and sanding your substrate, using the correct undercoats (primers) for your substrate, and making sure you topcoat is within the recommended flash times for the material you’re using.

Pinholing
Pinholing occurs in and over body filler or putty when air bubbles are trapped inside the fillers during mixing. These bubbles are then exposed during sanding creating small holes or craters in the surface. Sometimes the air or gas trapped in these pinholes will affect the topcoat by rising to the surface. Filler-caused pinholing problems are often created during the mixing of the hardener when you whip the filler/hardener mixture in a rapid circular motion. Keep in mind, you’re not making a cake; filler should be mixed by consistently folding the mixture over itself until the hardener is fully dispersed. Too much hardener will also cause pinholing to become more likely. One last possible cause is excessive filler thickness. Globbing on huge dollops of filler (rather than trying to repair a dent) produces a lot of heat as the filler/hardener mixture catalyzes, and could cause gas formation and pinholing.
If you do end up with a pinholing (and you notice it before painting) situation you can apply a thin coating of spot putty or polyester glazing putty and sand it smooth, filling the pinholes and hopefully correcting the problem, though this route is more of a Band-Aid.

Dust ‘N’ Dirt
Crap in your paint is by far the most common of all paint headaches, and actually for those of us (read that most of us) who don’t have access to a big-buck spray booth, one that we’ll never completely rectify. With that said, all we can do is work to reduce the amount of dust and dirt as best we can. This can be accomplished by making sure that your spray environment (garage in most cases) is as clean as possible. Wet down the floor before you spray, and if possible between coats. Make sure the vehicle’s surface is clean (I’m talking about all around the windows, door, hood, and trunk jambs). Don’t forget to tack off your masking paper and tape masked areas as well. And you should use a fresh new tack rag as often as possible. Another thing a lot of people don’t think about is static electricity-it really does come into play in this situation by actually attracting dust to the vehicle like a magnet (especially after all the compressed air blowing and hand wiping done during your final prep). Running a ground strap from the chassis of your vehicle to a good ground in the garage will help out more than you could imagine. I’ve tried it, continue to do it, and think it really does help.
Personally I’ve given up hope for a completely dust-free paint job in my home two-car garage-I’ve sometimes been able to bury very minor dust spots using another coat of color, but in most major dust cases the surface will have to be sanded with 1200-grit or finer paper and either buffed or re-sprayed. Unfortunately, a clean, professional booth is the only real solution to this one.

Slow Dry
Slow dry, or softness as it’s sometimes called, is when your paint ends up dry but soft to the touch and susceptible to retaining fingerprints or water spotting hours or days after it should be dry and hard. This can be caused by shooting your under or topcoats really heavy and wet, not allowing sufficient flash time between coats, adding too much or too little hardener to your paint materials, or using the wrong thinner/reducer for your temperature conditions. You can avoid slow dry by making sure it’s at least 70 degrees where and when you spray, by using the correct hardeners for your materials and mixing them in the proper ratios, and by using the correct reducers/thinners for the temperatures encountered. Rectifying soft film can be accomplished by force drying if possible, or by removing soft film and re-prepping and spraying.

Shrinking
Also known as edge mapping or bulls-eyes, shrinking is when a repaired area’s feather edging becomes visible shortly (within days) after a paint job is completed. Shrinking is primarily caused by shooting a topcoat before the undercoat has thoroughly dried. Or when you pile up multiple wet or heavy undercoats without sufficient flash time between ‘em, or possibly even applying a finish over body filler that’s not completely cured. This situation can be fixed by allowing the affected area to dry or cure fully and then sanding and refinishing as needed.
You can ofttimes prevent the situation by making sure your body filler is completely cured before priming, making sure you thin/reduce your undercoats per label directions, and by applying undercoats in lighter coats and letting them flash to avoid bridging sand scratches.

Solvent Popping
Solvent popping, or boiling as it’s sometimes known, can be recognized by groups of small bubbles or crater-like openings in the paint surface. This condition is often caused by solvent getting trapped in the paint film when it skims over before all the solvent is allowed to evaporate. The solvents left under the paint film rise up ultimately “popping” through the surface leaving pinholes or craters. This is caused by the paint film skinning over because either too fast a reducer/thinner was used, or there was excessive air movement over and around the vehicle that dried the surface before the buried solvents had time to evaporate. This situation can be fixed by allowing the affected area to dry or cure fully and then sanding and refinishing as needed, or if it’s severe, you may have to strip the affected area and then prime, seal, and recoat as needed.

Mottling
Mottling, also referred to as streaking, floating, or zebra striping, is a streaked, spotty, or striped appearance that shows up in a metallic or candy (transparent) finish. It’s a tough one to show in an image, but in the case of metallics, it’s when the flake flows unevenly in the wet topcoat resulting in pooling or flowing outward into a sort of ring, leaving some areas with less flake and some with more causing light and dark areas. Mottling with candies is more apt to look like zebra stripes rather than the flowing or pooling you see with metallics. Mottling can be caused by a bunch of factors, among them are an unbalanced spray pattern, tilting the spray gun so the fan is heavier either at the top or bottom of the pattern, over thinning or reducing the finish, applying a clearcoat before the basecoat has completely flashed, and improper overlap when making your passes. You can help prevent mottling by using the correct needle/nozzle/air cap combination on your gun, adjusting it for a proper spray pattern, keeping it perpendicular to the surface being sprayed, using the recommended thinning/reducing ratio when mixing your material, and allowing proper flash/dry times before clearcoating.
If you do end up with a mottling problem with a metallic color, you may be able to rectify it with a higher pressure mist coat while your previous coat is still wet, or allow the basecoat to flash and come back with a lower pressure mist coat. Just remember, if you allow a mottled panel to completely dry, you’ll have to sand and refinish it from scratch.

Grit
Grit, sometimes referred to as seediness, is the dispersion of solid particles of different sizes embedded in the paint surface. This usually happens when your paint material isn’t properly or completely stirred, or more commonly when you don’t strain your paint or primer. You may also run into a grit problem when using old paint (like that can of color you’ve had stashed waiting for the “right” car to use it on) or by using material past its pot life (the amount of time before the catalyst really begins to kick in and starts to harden the material).
Repair options in the case of grit are the same as those from runs and sags-you can wipe the area with a solvent wetted rag and then clean and re-spray the area (seldom a first choice), or you can keep on going and wait till the paint fully cures and then sand and buff or sand and re-spray. Grit prevention can be achieved by mixing your materials thoroughly, straining all your under and topcoats, and mixing up only enough material to use within its specified pot life.

Blistering
Blistering, sometimes called pimples, are bubbles or swelled areas that show up in the paint surface weeks or months after a paint job. They’re caused by moisture that’s been trapped under the paint surface and is sometimes caused by spraying during really high humidity conditions. It can also be caused by contaminated air lines, failure to drain your compressor, or by painting over an unclean or contaminated surface. Blistering can sometimes be repaired by sanding the affected area and refinishing, but usually one has to actually strip the area to its bare substrate and start from scratch. This malady can be prevented by always draining your compressor and air lines, proper cleaning and prepping before painting, making sure everything is totally dry after wet sanding, and making sure you use the correct thinner/reducer for your spray conditions.

Discoloration
Discoloration, or bleed-through is a yellowish stain that appears in the topcoat over areas repaired using glazing putty or body filler. It’s usually caused by too much, or in the opposite, too little hardener in the putty or filler. It can also be caused by incomplete mixing of either, or from priming before the filler/putty is fully cured. In minor cases it may disappear as the topcoat fully cures, but normally you’ll have to sand, seal, and refinish the area. You can usually eliminate the bleed-through by making sure you don’t use excessive amounts of crme hardener, by mixing fillers or putty completely, or by sealing any repair areas before painting.

Blushing
Blushing is a common problem when spraying in high-humidity conditions. It happens when the air and evaporating solvent from the spray gun lowers the temperature of the surface being painted to below the dew point (the temperature at which air becomes saturated and produces water). This condition causes condensation in or on the paint layer producing a smoky or milky looking cloud on the paint surface. Blushing can normally be corrected by adding a bit of retarder (a slow-evaporating solvent) to your paint mixture and then recoating, or by letting the finish cure and then compounding and buffing.
You can help prevent blushing by using a good-quality thinner/reducer that’s correct for your conditions, adding the recommended amount of retarder when spraying in humid conditions, or by applying heat after application to help evaporate excess moisture.

www.learnautopainting.com
Here’s our list of common paint problems:

Bleeding – Original finish discoloring or color seeping through the newtopcoat color.
Blistering – Bubbles or pimples appearing in the topcoat film, oftenmonths after application.
Blushing – A milky white haze that appears on lacquer films.
Chalking – Finish formation caused by pigment powder no longer held bybinder, making a dull finish.
Chemical Staining – Spotty discoloration of the surface.
Chipping – Small chips of a finish losing adhesion to the underlying layer(substrate).
Cracking – A series of deep cracks running in no definite pattern.
Crazing – Fine splits or small cracks that completely checker an area in anirregular manner.
Die Back – Loss of gloss after application.
Dirt – Small bumps deposited in, on, or under the paint film.
Dry Spray – A rough, textured surface often confined to a smallarea.
Featheredge Splitting – Appears as stretch marks (or cracking) along thefeatheredge. Occurs during/shortly after topcoat is applied over lacquer

primer.

Fish Eyes – Tiny surface finish blemishes that resemble small circles ofpopped paint bubbles, of fish eye appearance.
Gloss/DOI – Poor Gloss Finish.
Lifting – Surface distortion or shriveling, while the topcoat is beingapplied or while drying.
Line Checking – A series of parallel lines or cracks ranging from veryshort up to about 18 inches.
Micro-Checking – Severe dulling of the film containing many minutecracks that do not touch.
Mottling – Only in metallics when the flakes float together to form aspotty or striped appearance.
Orange Peel – Uneven Surface Formation – with an orange peeltexture.
Overspray – Paint materials from another unit falling on adjacentsurfaces.
Paint Color Matching – Finished panels that don’t match the color ofstandard panels.
Paint Runs and Sags – Heavy application of sprayed material failing toadhere uniformly to the surface.
Peeling Paint – Loss of adhesion between paint and substrate.
Pinholing – Tiny holes or groups of holes in the finish or in putty or bodyfiller.
Sand Scratches – Sanding pattern imperfections that show through thefinished paint film.
Sandscratch Swelling – Enlarged sand scratches caused by swelling actionof topcoat solvents.
Soft Paint – Easy to damage or penetrate paint film with fingernail.
Solvent Popping – Blisters on the paint surface caused by trappedsolvents in the topcoats or primer.
Water Spotting – General dulling of gloss in spots or masses ofspots.
Wet Spots – Discoloration and/or the slow drying of various areas.
Wrinkling – Surface distortions/shriveling that occurs while enameltopcoat is being applied (or later during the drying stage.)
Bleeding
Condition : Original finish discoloring or color seepingthrough the new topcoat color.
Causes

Contamination – usually in the form of soluble dyesor pigments on the older finish before it was repainted. (This is especially true

with older shades of red).

Prevention

Thoroughly clean areas to be painted before sanding, especially whenapplying lighter colors over darker colors.

Solution : Apply two medium coats of Bleeder seal in

accordance with label instructions. Then reapply color coat.


Blistering
Condition : Bubbles or pimples appearing in the topcoatfilm, often months after application.
Causes

Improper surface cleaning or preparation

Tiny specks of dirt left on the surface can act as a sponge and hold moisture.

When the finish is exposed to the sun (or abrupt changes in atmospheric

pressure), moisture expands and builds up pressure. If the pressure is great

enough, blisters form.

Wrong thinner or reducer

Use of a fast-dry thinner or reducer, especially when the material is sprayed

too dry or at an excessive pressure. Air or moisture can be trapped in the film.

Excessive film thickness

Insufficient drying time between coats or too heavy application of the

undercoats may trap solvents which escape later and blister the color coat.

Contamination of compressed air lines

Oil, water or dirt in lines.
Prevention

Thoroughly clean areas to be painted before sanding. Be sure surface iscompletely dry before applying either undercoats or topcoats. Don’t touch a

cleaned area as the oils in your hands will contaminate the surface.

Select the thinner or reducer most suitable for the existing paintingenvironment conditions.
Allow proper drying time for undercoats and topcoats. Be sure to let eachcoat flash before applying the next.
Drain and clean air pressure regulator daily to remove trapped moistureand dirt. Air compressor tank should also be drained daily.

Solution : If damage is extensive and severe, paint must

be removed down to undercoat or metal, depending on the depth of blisters.

Then refinish. In less severe cases, blisters may be sanded out, resurfaced and

re-topcoated.


Blushing
Condition : A milky white haze that appears on lacquerfilms.
Causes

In hot humid weather, moisture droplets become trapped in the wetpaint film. Air currents from the spray gun and the evaporation of the thinner

tend to make the surface being sprayed lower in temperature than the

surrounding atmosphere. This causes moisture in the air to condense on the

wet paint film.

Excessive air pressure.
Too fast a thinner.

Prevention

In hot humid weather try to schedule painting early in the morning whentemperature and humidity conditions are more suitable, use acrylic lacquer

thinner.

Use proper gun adjustments and techniques.
Select the thinner that is suitable for existing painting environmentconditions.

Solution : Add retarder to the thinned color and apply

additional coats.


Chalking
Condition : Formation on the finish caused by pigmentpowder no longer held by the binder, which makes the finish look dull.
Causes (other than normal exposure)

Wrong thinner or reducer, which can harm topcoat durability.
Materials not uniformly mixed.
Starved paint film.
Excessive mist coats when finishing a metallic color application.

Prevention

Select the thinner or reducer that is best suited for existing environmentalconditions.
Stir all pigmented undercoats and topcoats thoroughly.
Meet or slightly exceed minimum film thicknesses.
Apply metallic color as evenly as possible so that misting is not required.When mist coats are necessary to even out flake, avoid using straight

reducer.

Solution : Remove surface in affected area by sanding.

Then clean and refinish.


Chemical Staining
Condition : Spotty discoloration of the surface.
Causes

Atmospheric contamination falling on the finish in the presence ofmoisture or rain – usually due to adjacent industrial activity.

Prevention

Avoid contaminated atmosphere or wash surface with detergent andwater as soon as possible after exposure.
Apply clear coat.

Solution : After washing with detergent and water, rub

affected area with rubbing compound and polish. In severe cases, sand to

prime and refinish.


ChippingCondition : Small chips of a finish losing adhesion to the

underlying layer (substrate) usually caused by impact of stones or hard

objects.


Cracking (Line Checking, Micro-Checking)
Condition : A series of deep cracks resembling mud cracksin a dry pond and in no definite pattern, they are usually through the color

coat and sometimes the undercoat as well.
Causes

Excessive film thickness. (Excessively thick topcoats magnify normalstresses and strains which can result in cracking even under normal

conditions.)

Materials not uniformly mixed.
Insufficient flash time.
Incorrect use of additive.

Prevention

Don’t pile on topcoats. Allow sufficient flash and dry time between coats.Do not dry by gun fanning.
Stir all pigmented undercoats and topcoats thoroughly. Strain and wherenecessary, add Fish Eye Eliminator to topcoats.
Read and carefully follow label instructions. (Additives not specificallydesigned for a color coat may weaken the final paint film and make it more

sensitive to cracking.)

Solution : The affected areas must be sanded to a smooth

finish or in extreme cases removed down to the bare metal and refinished.


Crazing
Condition : Fine splits or small cracks often called’crowsfeet’ that completely checker an area in an irregular manner.
Causes

Work area too cold. (Surface tension of original material is under stressand literally shatters under the softening action of the solvents being

applied.)

Prevention

Select the thinner or reducer that is suitable for existing work areaconditions. Schedule painting to avoid temperature and humidity extremes in

the work area or between temperature of work area and your paint job. (Bring

the vehicle to room temperature before refinishing.)

Solution : There are two ways to overcome crazing:

Continue to apply wet coats of topcoat to melt the crazing and flowpattern together (using the wettest possible solvent work area conditions will

allow)

Use a fast-flashing thinner which will allow a bridging of subsequenttopcoats over the crazing area.

Die Back
Condition : Loss of gloss after application.
Cause : Improper evaporation of solvent or poor initialcure.
Suggested Corrective Action Checklist

Check if the imperfection is on the whole unit or in a specific area.
Check other units to determine if a pattern is beginning to takeplace.
Check for too fast a solvent selection.
Check for cool temperature during cure.
Check for lack of airflow during cure.
Check for improper film build up.
Check for improper flash times.
Check for incompatible products.

Dirt
Condition : Small bumps deposited in, on, or under thepaint film.
Cause : Foreign particles entering the wet paint film.
Suggested Corrective Action Checklist

Check if the imperfection is on the whole unit or in a specific area.
Check other units to determine if a pattern is beginning to takeplace.
Check paint mixing/filtration process (was a strainer in place atop thepaint cup when pouring in paint)
Check the spraying environment (booth, garage, workshop)
Check preparation process of unit, tacking, solvent wash, etc.
Check painter’s clothing.
Check the spraying equipment (was it thoroughly cleaned after previoususe)
Check used paint filters for contamination.
Check for use of anti-static wipe or spray products.

Dry Spray
Condition : A rough, textured surface often confined to asmall area.
Cause : Paint that lacks the ability to flow properly.
Suggested Corrective Action Checklist

Check if the imperfection is on the whole unit or in a specific area.
Check other units to determine if a pattern is beginning to takeplace.
Check if the defect is specific to one color or many colors.
Check for a proper film build up.
Check for excessive film build up.
Check the distance of the spray gun from the surface when spraying.(You should always hold a paint gun at right angles to the surface being

painted from a distance of 6-10 inches.)

Check reducing solvent selection and spray viscosity.

Featheredge Splitting
Condition : Appears as stretch marks (or cracking) alongthe featheredge. Occurs during or shortly after the topcoat is applied over

lacquer primer.
Causes

‘Piling on’ the undercoat in heavy and wet coats. (Solvent is trapped inundercoat layers which have not had sufficient time to set up.)
Material not uniformly mixed. (Due to the high pigment content ofprimer, it’s possible for settling to occur after it has been thinned. Delayed use

of this material without restirring results in applying a film with loosely held

pigment containing voids and crevices throughout, causing the film to act like

a sponge.)

Wrong thinner.
Improper surface cleaning or preparation. (When not properly cleaned,primer coats may crawl or draw away from the edge because of poor wetting

and adhesion.)

Improper drying. (Fanning with a spray gun after the primer is appliedwill result in drying the surface before solvent or air from the lower layers is

released.)

Excessive use (and film build) of putty.

Prevention

Apply properly reduced primer in thin to medium coats (150%reduction) with enough time between coats to allow solvents and air to

escape.

Stir all pigmented undercoats and top coats thoroughly. Select thinnerthat is suitable for existing work area conditions.
Select only thinners that are recommended for existing work areaconditions.
Thoroughly clean areas to be painted before sanding.
Apply primer in thin to medium coats with enough time between coats toallow solvents and air to escape.
Lacquer putty should be limited to filling minor imperfections. Puttyapplied too heavily (or too thick) will eventually shrink causing featheredge

splitting.

Solution : Remove finish from the affected areas and

refinish.


Fish Eyes
Condition : Tiny surface finish blemishes that resemblesmall circles of popped paint bubbles, which seem to occur almost as soon as

paint hits an auto body surface.
Causes

Improper Surface Cleaning Or Preparation

Many waxes and polishes contain silicone, the most common cause of fish

eyes. Small traces of silicone do not allow paint to settle evenly; rather they

cause material to encircle the speck of silicone and form a fish’s eye.
Silicone adheres firmly to the paint film and requires extra effort for its

removal. Even small quantities in sanding dust, rags or from cars being

polished nearby can cause this failure.
- Check for possible contamination in paint materials.
- Check for painter contamination, skin oils, perspiration,

greasy foods, etc.
- Check for any oils or contamination that might get into the spray area.
- Check for proper cleaning procedures prior to refinishing.
- Check airborne contamination in spray area.

Effects of the old finish or previous repair : Old finishor previous repair may contain excessive amounts of silicone from additives

used during their application. Usually solvent wiping will not remove

embedded silicone.

Contamination of air lines : Check for oil in air linesand spray equipment.

Prevention

Precautions should be taken to remove all traces of silicone bythoroughly cleaning with wax and grease remover. (The use of Fish Eye

Eliminator is in no way a replacement for good surface preparation).

Add Fish Eye Eliminator.
Drain and clean air pressure regulator daily to remove trapped moistureand dirt. Air compressor tank should also be drained daily.

Solution : After affected coat has set up, apply another

double coat of color containing the recommended amount of Fish Eye

Eliminator. In severe cases, affected areas should be sanded down and

refinished.


Gloss/DOI
Description : DOI is the sharpness by which images arereflected in the surface of a top coat finish. The images are usually evaluated

for 90-degree angle. Gloss measures the amount of light reflected from a paint

surface read at 20- and 60-degree angles.
Cause : Poor DOI is caused by an non-smooth or irregular

top coat surface and/or low gloss. Low gloss is caused by an improper topcoat

application process or improper solvent selection.
Suggested Corrective Action Checklist

Check if the imperfection is on the whole unit or in a specific area.
Check other units to determine if a pattern is beginning to takeplace.
Check film build up (is it too low)
Check solvent selection.
Check heat during cure process (too low).
Check airflow during initial cure.
Check reduction ratio (over reduction).
Check for uncured undercoats.

Lifting
Condition : Surface distortion or shriveling, while thetopcoat is being applied or while drying.
Causes

Use of incompatible materials. (Solvents in new topcoat attack old surfacewhich results in a distorted or wrinkled effect.)
Insufficient flash time. (Lifting will occur when the paint film is an alkydenamel and is only partially cured. The solvents from the coat being applied

cause localized swelling or partial dissolving which later distorts the final

surface.)

Improper dry. (When synthetic enamel type undercoats are notthoroughly dry, topcoating with lacquer can result in lifting.)
Effect of old finish or previous repair. (Lacquer applied over a fresh air-dry enamel finish will cause lifting.)
Improper surface cleaning or preparation. (Use of an enamel type primeror sealer over an original lacquer finish which is to be topcoated with a lacquer

will result in lifting due to a sandwich effect.)

Wrong thinner or reducer. (The use of lacquer thinners in enamelincreases the amount of substrate swelling and distortion which can lead to

lifting, particularly when two toning or recoating.)

Prevention

Avoid incompatible materials such as a thinner with enamel products orincompatible sealers and primers.
Don’t pile on topcoats. Allow sufficient flash and dry time. Final topcoatshould be applied when the previous coat is still soluble or after it has

completely dried and is impervious to topcoat solvents.

Select the thinner or reducer that is correct for the finish applied andsuitable for existing work area conditions.

Solution : Remove finish from affected areas and refinish.


Line Checking
Condition : Similar to cracking , except that the lines or cracks are more parallel and range from very short up to about 18 inches.

Causes

Excessive film thickness.
Improper surface preparation. (Often times the application of a newfinish over an old film which had cracked and was not completely removed.)

Prevention

Don’t pile on topcoats. Allow sufficient flash and dry time. Do not dry bygun fanning.
Thoroughly clean areas to be painted before sanding. Be sure surface iscompletely dry before applying undercoats or topcoats.

Solution : Remove color coat down to primer and apply
new color coat.


Micro-Checking
Condition : Appears as severe dulling of the film, butwhen examined with a magnifying glass, it contains many small cracks that do

not touch.
Micro-checking is the beginning of film breakdown and may be an indication
that film failures such as cracking or crazing will develop.
Solution : Sand off the color coat to remove the cracks,

then recoat as required.


Mottling
Condition : Occurs only in metallics when the flakes floattogether to form a spotty or striped appearance.
Causes

Wrong thinner or reducer: Check the reducing solvent and itsviscosity.
Materials not uniformly mixed
Spraying too wet

- Check solvent selection.
- Check for excessively high fluid delivery.
- Check the equipment setup (fluid delivery).

Holding spray gun too close to work: Check the distance of the spray gunfrom the surface when spraying. (You should always hold a paint gun at right

angles to the surface being painted from a distance of 6-10 inches).

Uneven spray pattern: Check your paint spray gun pattern.
Low Painting Area Temperature

- Check temperature in spray environment (too cool).
- Check temperature of unit being sprayed.

Alternatives

- Check if the imperfection is on the whole unit or in a specific area.
- Check other units to determine if a pattern is beginning to take place.
- Check for proper flash and dry times.
- Check if defect is specific to one color or many.
- Check atomizing air pressure.
Prevention

Select the thinner or reducer most suitable for existing painting areaconditions.
Stir all pigmented topcoats – especially metallics thoroughly.
Use proper gun adjustments, techniques and air pressure.
Keep your spray gun clean (especially the needle fluid tip and air cap)and in good working condition.

Solution : Allow color coat to set up and apply a drier

double coat or two single coats, depending upon which topcoat you are

applying.


Orange Peel
Condition : Uneven Surface Formation – much like thephysical appearance of orange peel. Results from poor coalescence of

atomized paint droplets. Paint droplets dry out before they can flow out and

level smoothly together.
Causes

Improper Gun Adjustment and Techniques

- Check for low air pressure.
- Check for wide fan spray patterns.
- Check the distance of the spray gun from the surface when spraying. You

should always hold a paint gun at right angles to the surface being painted

from a distance of 6-10 inches. Spraying at excessive gun distances causes

droplets to become too dry during their travel time to the work surface and

they remain as formed by gun nozzle.
- Check the spray gun was setup properly using the correct tips and spray cap.

Extreme Painting Environment Temperature

When the air temperature is too high, droplets lose more solvent and dry out

before they can flow and level properly. The ideal temp to paint at is 22.5

degrees centigrade.

Improper Drying

Gun fanning before paint droplets have a chance to flow together will cause

orange peel.

Improper flash or re-coat time between coats

If the first coats of enamel are allowed to become too dry, the solvent in the

paint droplets of following coats will be absorbed into the first coat before

proper flow is achieved.

Wrong and/or too little thinner or reducer

Under-diluted paint or paint thinner with fast evaporating solvents causes the

atomized droplets to become too dry before reaching the surface.

Materials not uniformly mixed

Many finishes are formulated with components that aid coalescence. If these

are not properly mixed, orange peel will result.

Alternatives

- Check the smoothness of the substrate surface.
- Check if the imperfection is specific to the one color.
Prevention

Use proper gun adjustments, techniques and air pressure.
Schedule painting to avoid temperature and humidity extremes. Selectthe thinner or reducer that is suitable for existing conditions. (The use of a

slower evaporating solvent will overcome this.)

Always allow sufficient flash and dry times. Never dry by fanning.
Always allow proper drying time for undercoats and topcoats. (Not toolong or too short.)
Select the thinner or reducer that is most suitable for existingenvironmental conditions to provide good flow and leveling of topcoat.
Reduce to recommended viscosity with proper thinner/reducer.
Stir all pigmented undercoats and topcoats thoroughly.

Solution : Compounding may help with removing orange

peel from paint – a mild polishing compound for enamel, rubbing compound

for lacquer. In extreme cases, sand down to a smooth surface and refinish,

using a slower evaporating solvent at the correct air pressure.


Overspray
Condition : Paint materials from another unit falling onadjacent surfaces.
Cause : Misdirected spray droplets or dry spray.
Suggested Corrective Action Checklist

Check if the imperfection is on the whole unit or in a specific area.
Check other units to determine if a pattern is beginning to takeplace.
Check for correct booth (work area) air balance and flow.
Check for sequence of panel application.
Check paint spray gun technique.
Check if defect is specific to one color.
Check air pressure (too high).
Check for over reduction.

Paint Color Matching
Condition : Finished panels that don’t match the color ofstandard panels.
Cause : Variations in application and/or paint materials.
Suggested Corrective Action Checklist

Check other units to determine if a pattern is beginning to takeplace.
Check for complete hiding.
Check for variables in spray application.
Check lines and equipment for leftover contamination from previouscolor.
Check for improper mixing.
Check for proper agitation.
Check gun pattern.
Check the distance of the spray gun from the surface when spraying.(You should always hold a paint gun at right angles to the surface being

painted from a distance of 6-10 inches.)

Check that you setup the equipment correctly.

Paint Runs and Sags
Condition : Heavy application of sprayed material that failsto adhere uniformly to the surface.
Causes

Too much thinner or reducer: Check for excessive fluid delivery.
Wrong thinner or reducer

- Check the solvent selection is correct (not too slow).
- Check to see if the paint was reduced correctly.

Excessive film thickness without allowing proper dry time

- Check for excessive film build up.
- Check for too short flash (dry) time.
- Check for excessive application overlap.

Low air pressure (causing lack of atomization), holding gun too close ormaking too slow a gun pass

- Check the distance of the spray gun from the surface when spraying. (You

should always hold a paint gun at right angles to the surface being painted

from a distance of 6-10 inches.)
- Check for insufficient air pressure.

Painting environment or surface too cold

- Check for low spray area temperature.
- Check temperature of unit.
- Check temperature of paint.
Prevention

Read and carefully follow label instructions. Select the thinner or reducerthat is suitable for existing shop conditions.
Select proper thinner/reducer.
Don’t pile on finishes. Allow sufficient flash and dry time in betweencoats.
Use proper gun adjustment, techniques and air pressure.
Allow vehicle surface to warm up to at least room temperature beforeattempting to refinish. Try to maintain an appropriate painting area

temperature for paint areas.

Solution : Wash off the affected area and let dry until you

can sand affected area to a smooth surface and refinish.


Peeling Paint
Condition : Loss of adhesion between paint and substrate(topcoat to primer and/or old finish, or primer to metal.)
Causes

Improper cleaning or preparation: Failure to remove surfacecontamination such as oil, sanding residue, overspray, water, solvent cleaner

residue and other surface contaminants will prevent the finish coat from

coming into proper contact with the substrate.

Poor surface preparation prior to top coat application

- Check for non-sanding of substrate or primer application.
- Check for case hardening of substrate.

Materials not uniformly mixed

- Check for incompatible products.
- Check for a proper film build up.

Failure to use proper sealer

- Check solvent selection is correct (not too fast).
- Check for thin sealer film builds or no sealer.

Alternatives: Check for masking tape contacting the paintedsurface.

Prevention

Thoroughly clean areas to be painted. (It’s always good practice to washthe sanding dust and any surface contamination off the area to be refinished).

Use wax and grease remover prior to applying top coats and the use of a tack

cloth just after using wax and grease remover will help to pick up very fine

particles of lint, dust and other debris.

Use correct metal conditioner and conversion coating.
Stir all pigmented undercoats and topcoats thoroughly.
Use sealers to improve adhesion of topcoats.

Solution : Remove finish from an area slightly larger than

the affected area and refinish.


Pinholing
Condition : Tiny holes or groups of holes in the finish orin putty or body filler, usually the result of trapped solvents, air or moisture.
Causes

Improper surface cleaning or preparation. (Moisture left on primer willpass through the wet topcoat to cause pinholing.)
Contamination of air lines. (Moisture or oil in air lines will enter paintwhile being applied and cause pinholes when released during the drying

stage.)

Wrong gun adjustment or technique. (If adjustments or techniques resultin application which is too wet, or if the gun is held too close to the surface,

pinholes will occur when the air or excessive solvent is released during dry.)

Wrong thinner or reducer. (The use of a solvent that is too fast for workarea temperature tends to make the refinisher spray too close to the surface in

order to get adequate flow. When the solvent is too slow, it’s trapped by

subsequent topcoats.)

Improper dry. (Fanning a newly applied finish can drive air into thesurface or cause a skin dry – both of which result in pinholing when solvents

retained in lower layers come to the surface.)

Prevention

Thoroughly clean all areas to be painted. Be sure surface is completelydry before applying undercoats or topcoats.
Drain and clean air pressure regulator daily to remove to remove trappedmoisture and dirt. Air compressor tank should also be drained daily.
Use proper gun adjustments, techniques and air pressure.
Select the thinner or reducer that is suitable for existing work areaconditions.
Allow sufficient flash and dry time. Do not dry by fanning.

Solution : Sand affected area down to smooth finish and

refinish.


Sand Scratches
Condition : Objectionable sanding pattern imperfectionsthat show through the finished paint film.
Cause : Imperfections due to soft primer, improper

sanding techniques and low top coat film build. Excessive film builds with

improper flash times.
Suggested Corrective Action Checklist

Check if the imperfection is on the whole unit or in a specific area.
Check other units to determine if a pattern is beginning to takeplace.
Check if defect is specific to one or many colors.
Check for correct sandpaper grit (too coarse).
Check topcoat film thickness.
Check for proper feathered edge technique.
Check for uncured primer.
Check for poor quality solvent used in undercoats.
Check for proper flash and dry times.
Check for excessive primer film builds.
Check for proper paint spray gun technique and atomization.
Check for under reduced primer (bridging scratches).
Check for sanding before primer is cured.
Check for film builds of sealer or no sealer.

Sandscratch Swelling
Condition : Enlarged sandscratches caused by swellingaction of topcoat solvents.
Causes

Improper surface cleaning or preparation. (Use of too coarse sandpaperor omitting a sealer in panel repairs greatly exaggerates swelling caused by

thinner penetration.)

Improper thinner or reducer (especially a slow-dry thinner or reducerwhen sealer has been omitted.)
Under-reduced or wrong thinner (too fast) used in primer causes’bridging’ of scratches.

Prevention

Use appropriate grits of sanding materials for the topcoats you areusing.
Seal to eliminate sandscratch swelling. Select thinner or reducer suitablefor existing work area conditions.
Use proper thinner and reducer for primer.

Solution : Sand affected area down to smooth surface and

apply appropriate sealer before refinishing.


Soft Paint
Condition : Easy to damage or penetrate paint film withfingernail.
Cause : Insufficient cure of paint film.
Suggested Corrective Action Checklist

Check if the imperfection is on the whole unit or in a specific area.
Check other units to determine if a pattern is beginning to takeplace.
Check for improper film build up.
Check hardener (old, improper or contaminated).
Check for improper mixing ratio.
Check for improper heat during cure (drying) time.
Check for improper airflow.
Check flash or dry times.
Check solvent selection (not too fast).
Check for excessive humidity.
Check for cool spray area temperature.

Solvent Popping
Condition : Blisters on the paint surface caused by trappedsolvents in the topcoats or primer – a situation which is further aggravated by

force drying or uneven heating.
Causes

Improper surface cleaning or preparation

- Check other units to determine if a pattern is beginning to take place.
- Check if the imperfection is on the whole unit or in a specific area.
- Check if defect is specific to one or many colors.
- Check if defect is most prevalent on horizontal surfaces.

Wrong thinner or reducer

- Use of fast-dry thinner or reducer, especially when the material is sprayed

too dry or at excessive pressure, can cause solvent popping by trapping air in

the film.
- Check for correct reducing solvent.

Excessive film thickness

- Insufficient drying time between coats and too heavy application of the

undercoats may trap solvents causing popping of the color coat as they later

escape.
- Check for excessive film build up.
- Check for high fluid delivery.
- Check for high viscosity.
- Check for too much overlapping in film build.
- Check for proper flash and purge times.

Alternatives

- Check for high temperature in first part of force dry.
- Check for low air pressure.
Prevention

Thoroughly clean areas to be painted.
Select the thinner or reducer most suitable for existing painting areaconditions.
Don’t pile on undercoats or topcoats. Allow sufficient flash and dry time.Allow proper drying time for undercoats and topcoats. Allow each coat of

primer to flash naturally – do not fan.

Solution : For refinishing solvent popping, if damage is

extensive and severe, paint must be removed down to undercoat or metal,

depending on depth of blisters; then refinish. In less severe cases, sand out,

re-surface and re-apply topcoat.


Water Spotting
Condition : General dulling of gloss in spots or masses ofspots.
Causes

Water evaporating on finish before it’s thoroughly dry.
Washing finish in bright sunlight.

Prevention

Do not apply water to fresh paint job and try to keep newly-finished carout of rain. Allow sufficient dry time before delivering car to customer.
Wash car in shade and wipe completely dry.

Solution : Compound or polish with rubbing or polishing

compound. In severe cases, sand affected areas and refinish.


Wet Spots
Condition : Discoloration and/or the slow drying ofvarious areas.
Causes

Improper cleaning and preparation.
Improper drying of excessive undercoat film build.
Sanding with contaminated solvent.

Prevention

Thoroughly clean all areas to be painted.
Allow proper drying time for undercoats.
Wet sand with clean water.

Solution : Wash or sand affected areas thoroughly and

refinish.


Wrinkling
Condition : Surface distortions (or shriveling) that occurswhile enamel topcoat is being applied (or later during the drying stage.)
Causes

Improper dry. (When a freshly applied topcoat is baked or force dried toosoon, softening of the undercoats can occur. This increases topcoat solvent

penetration and swelling. In addition, baking or force drying causes surface

layers to dry too soon. The combination of these forces causes wrinkling.)

‘Piling on’ heavy or wet coats. (When enamel coats are too thick, thelower wet coats are not able to release their solvents and set up at the same

rate as the surface layer which results in wrinkling.)

Improper reducer or incompatible materials. (A fast-dry reducer or theuse of a lacquer thinner in enamel can cause wrinkling.)
Improper or rapid change in work area temperature. (Drafts of warm aircause enamel surfaces to set up and shrink before sub-layers have released

their solvents, which results in localized skinning in uneven patterns.)

Prevention

Allow proper drying time for undercoats and topcoats.
Don’t pile on topcoats. Allow sufficient flash and dry time.
Select proper reducer and avoid using incompatible materials such as areducer with lacquer products or thinner with enamel products.
Schedule painting to avoid temperature extremes or rapid changes.

Solution : Remove wrinkled enamel and refinish.

11 Responses to “Troubleshooting Automotive Paint Job Problems – Creating the Best Finish”

  1. [...] Troubleshooting Automotive Paint Job Problems – Creating the Best Finish « Hotcrowd&#039… [...]

  2. I just stumbleupon your blog and i must say what a fantastic website and great posts, I will bookmark your blog.Best Regards! Mark

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  5. darryl grifff said

    this site is going to be bookmarked as a favorite.very good info. i just had a problem with a baseball sized and almost perfectly round chunk of paint(clear coat color,primer,orig chevy top coat and primer coming off leaving clean non rusted sheet metal on my hood .the car is a early second gen Z28.i would think that i missed a spot when prepping the car for paint but the way it pulled the GM orig paint and primer leaving brand new sheet metal has me stumped.I shot the car in 08 with no problems until this happened. i used a 2 part polyester primer,with duoont factory matching color and the recommended dupont 2part urethane clear.any ideas as to what could cause this it did occur in very cold weather(for So Cal)and on one of the black hood stripes

  6. Lucy M. said

    Man, what a great post, thank you! I love the detailed breakdown. For me, I’ve always found it’s difficult to get the right tools and paints I need for the job without it costing an arm and a leg. In case anybody is interested, I found this site super helpful: http://www.eastwood.com/paints.html

  7. I seriously love yor site.. Great colors & theme. Did yyou build this web site yourself?
    Please reply bac as I’m wanting to create my own website and want to learn where you got this from
    or exactly what the theme is called. Kudos!

  8. MIKE said

    i sat and read your comments on the best way to get a paint job done. It was very interesting I must say. But the one problem I was looking for was MY PAINT GUN KEEPS ON JUST SPLUTTERING AND THE PAINT IS COMING OUT OF THE TOP OF THE LID.

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